What’s your dominant life narrative?

As children, we are convinced, naturally, that we’re the centre of life’s story.

We demand attention without rationale or reasoning, and are egocentric by design.

As we grow older, we start to assess and validate the life stories of others.

We become more able to celebrate our friends, and the things they contribute to our world.

Perhaps, in a sense, we also start to see ourselves and others as bit players – or extras – in the drama of life.

Rather than the lead.

As Christians we discover that God is the star of the bigger story.

In his book Orthodoxy, G.K. Chesterton writes:

“I had always felt life first as a story: and if there is a story there is a storyteller.”

Sometimes we convince ourselves that we are the main storytellers, but I prefer to believe that God is telling his grand story through us.

And his most important story was told through the life of Jesus.

His story can transform hearts, and give us a different perspective on our own narratives.

Sometimes, however, we become so sidetracked by the demands and desires of life that we lose sight of the possibilities God offers for our future.

Speaker and social justice advocate Andrew Starr says each of us tends to live out a story of our own choosing.

He lists some possible stories, or narratives, that we might cling to:

1. The experience story.
In popular culture, and across our advertising channels, we’re told a narrative which revolves around ‘collecting experiences’.

This story is about living for the next thing – whether it’s the next country we visit, or the next amazing meal, or the next relationship.

Experience is king, and we will willingly sacrifice for the next “experience trophy” because there’s always a better one just around the corner.

Experience_Collectors_3

2. The religious story.
Many adhere to a religious story that revolves around karma, or the concept of ‘doing no harm’.

It essentially centres around an idea that ‘I am right and they are wrong’, and there’s a tendency to mish-mash a range of ideas under the umbrella of ‘my religion’.

3. The financial security story.
When we believe and live out this story, we live our lives in honour of (and sometimes slavery to) security.

This belief keeps us in the driver’s seat of life, and security worshippers tend to take pride in the life they’ve created rather than relying on the provision of God.

Fear often drives the financial security narrative.

4. The success story.
When we find our identity in how successful we are, we become addicted to the approval and validation of others.

But at what point have we finally ‘made it’?

When are we successful enough, or smart enough, or beautiful enough?

When are we enough?

5. The family story.
This is a common one.

When we allow our kids to become our story, our identity – our whole world – we set ourselves up for a life that’s destined to disappoint.

No matter how amazing our children are, they will never be able to meet all our emotional needs.

Clinging to our children can also side-track us from the issues and needs in our marriage.

And also make it that much harder to pursue other interests which help us to keep developing our identity into our later years.

Our dominant story influences how we make our decisions, says Starr.

We tell our story through our words and actions.

But the trouble is, too many of us are living very small stories that won’t satisfy our hearts.

They fail to provide us with the joy and freedom of wholehearted abandonment to Jesus and his will.

Not that living for Jesus means rejecting amazing experiences, or financial security, or time with our families… but reflecting on our dominant narrative, or story, can shine a light on the default modes which may impact us emotionally and spiritually into the future.

Remember that we are bit players. The star of the show is God.

What story does he want you to live out with him?

Is it the story you’ve been living all along, or does the second half of your life require a change of direction, or renewed philosophy?

Why don’t we ask God how to proceed?

Lord Jesus.

Reveal to me the primary story that’s been dominating my life, and show me where I’ve been rejecting you in favour of my own path which seems, at least on the surface, to satisfy.

Show me where I’ve been a slave to my fears or compulsions.

Show me the story you’d like me to live out.

May my priorities and goals for the rest of my life be in line with your perfect will and plan.

Amen

13 Comments

  1. Nice post! Odd I should be reading this now as I am at that stage in my life when I am questioning and considering past, present, and future stories in my own life.

      1. Perhaps it is a wee bit too clear and I just do not want to admit to it! One of those things that you do not know if you can do it. Know what I mean?

  2. Hi Ali,

    Great post! When I consider Oneness With God or He/She is telling a grand story through us it brings me to a realization that I am expressing God in suboptimal ways. The experience of being more optimal is kind of related to “being closer to God” except I’m counting the distance between me and God as zero. Living a more dominant God story has me recognizing God in others (optimizing my environment) including, but not limited to Jesus.

    In other words…the oneness within us is the most sacred communion. Settling here kinda transcends religions / hierarchies / complex arrangements that ignore oneness.

    What are your thoughts around our lightest essence?

    Mark

    1. Interesting thoughts, Mark. I’m not sure I understand the concept of the oneness within us, but I have found that having a relationship with the God of the universe, who made me, and sent his son Jesus to die to pay the price for my mistakes, to be the most healing thing. Oneness with my creator has transformed my life and my identity. Knowing I get to spend an eternity with him when I die gives me great peace and hope, because we live in such a broken world.

      1. Such a broken and really helpless world when we actually think about what we can and can’t do for ourselves and by ourselves that will go beyond the expiration dates of our breakable bodies.
        Very insightful article and speaks volumes to the reality of who and what we are and without God our Creator and His direct linkage through Jesus Christ we are nothing. I even screwed up with a bird I rescued several weeks ago which I cared for and allowed to heal and have perhaps a shot at flight and life in the world it was intended to live in, but one slip up or oversight by me led to its demise. Not good; and if I’m able to do that with a bird what does that say about what I can ultimately do for me that will have a better outcome than the birds in the end without Jesus taking over for me! This bird loss saddened me severely but how sad for me or any human being to suffer and lose their life and then immortal soul by screwing up!

  3. Hi Ali,

    love this blog, I love all your blogs and never have the chance to write and let you know.

    Some obviously mean more at a certain point in life than others, then there are times when I go back and re read your blogs because they become relevant. Keep doing what you are doing. Keep speaking God’s truth to the world. It makes a difference and it is a great read, it is important to be reminded of God’s truth and love, to keep the faith and have hope in a world where things sometimes feel hopeless.

    Your Sister in Christ

    Boyana

    ________________________________ From: Its a God thing… Sent: Monday, 18 July 2016 10:37 AM To: boyana21@hotmail.com Subject: [New post] What’s your dominant life narrative?

    GodGirl posted: “As children, we are convinced, naturally, that we’re the centre of life’s story. We demand attention without rationale or reasoning; and are egocentric by design. As we grow older, we start to assess and validate the life stories of others. We become mo” Respond to this post by replying above this line

    New post on It’s a God thing… [http://s0.wp.com/i/emails/blavatar.png] [http://1.gravatar.com/avatar/1218d256022b2df2701859cd47b72466?s=50&d=identicon&r=G] What’s your dominant life narrative? by GodGirl

    As children, we are convinced, naturally, that we’re the centre of life’s story.

    We demand attention without rationale or reasoning; and are egocentric by design.

    As we grow older, we start to assess and validate the life stories of others. We become more able to celebrate our friends, and the things they contribute to our world.

    Perhaps, in a sense, we also start to see ourselves and others as bit players – or extras – in the drama of life, rather than the lead.

    Not that we don’t try and play our parts with passion, but as Christians we discover that God is the star of the bigger story.

    1. Thanks so much for your kind and encouraging words, Boyana 🙂 Big hugs.
      I’m so glad they help at different times. Will do. It’s so important to have hope isn’t it? So glad we have hope in Christ, and that you and I can continue the journey together until the day we see him face to face 🙂

  4. This is so good! I feel like the world has come to a collective chapter during this season and that this is exactly the time for us to evaluate the story we are living in the light of God’s plan and redirect our narratives according to the wisdom God gives us.

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